Best gun, mid grade or low grade

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Rick Riddell 180
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed Dec 04, 2019 11:38 am

Best gun, mid grade or low grade

Post by Rick Riddell 180 » Tue Dec 31, 2019 7:19 pm

I was curious to see where this gun would have been grade wise in 1888. As of right now it has been restored. AG&L had records on this gun and here are the specs given:

“It would appear that the gun weighed 6lbs’ 9oz ,2.6 foot barrels, weight of barrels 3lbs 4 1/2oz, had a stock length of 14 5/8 and had drop measurements of 1 ½ and 2 3/16 inch.”

The gun has been restocked with the similar specs minus the pad, which I’m hoping to replicate with a slivers
( if that would be appropriate, any advise on that would be great!)
The barrels were sleeved in 1977 using 26” outsourced Belgian tubes, but the balance is right at the hinge, who ever did the work took the time to get it right as it’s virtually invisible. It weighs 6lbs 1oz. So it has gained 4 oz’s. It’s a great shooter and I’m very pleased with it! Someone mentioned it has “Duckbill” locks and was a low grade gun. I can’t seem to find reference to “Duckbill” is that such a thing? Any help or further insight would be great!


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Last edited by Rick Riddell 180 on Sun Jan 05, 2020 1:41 am, edited 1 time in total.

Tim Wilkes 43
Posts: 68
Joined: Fri Jun 09, 2017 1:43 pm

Re: Best gun, mid grade or low grade

Post by Tim Wilkes 43 » Wed Jan 01, 2020 8:58 am

I’ve not heard of duckbill in connection with dipped locks, similar to those used often at that time by Lancaster and Rigby as well as Holland and Holland on their Dominion models.

As to grade, this gun appears to be a Rogers action. It also has the barrel lump visible through the underside of the action body. Both these clues point to the gun being below best grade. In fact I would guess the action was bought in from the trade, perhaps with the rest of the gun, then finished off and named by Lang.

None of that should put you off what is clearly a gun you’re happy and content with and which still retains the ability to knock the birds out of the sky. The fact it can still do so 140 odd years after it was made is a grand tribute to the skill and workmanship that went into its making.

Tim

John 39
Posts: 246
Joined: Mon May 22, 2017 5:30 pm

Re: Best gun, mid grade or low grade

Post by John 39 » Wed Jan 01, 2020 11:49 am

Is this a 20 bore? Dipped edge lock plates were fashionable when this was made. The engraving with gold inlay on the name on the barrels suggests this was a good if not very good rather than a low grade gun. Do I see some unusual bolsters? These were probably built into the gun because of the light weight of the action body. Interesting!

Rick Riddell 180
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed Dec 04, 2019 11:38 am

Re: Best gun, mid grade or low grade

Post by Rick Riddell 180 » Wed Jan 01, 2020 12:42 pm

It’s a 12b I wish the inlay was original but it was highlighted for the picture, sorry for the deception. The safety is gold inlaid and there my have been inlay on the cocking indicators that have been lost some time in its past. What I have found was James and Edward both got parts in the rough from Osborne. It was a cheap gun and I’m glad I had the opportunity to grab it. I wasn’t sure where it fell in the London spectrum during the time period. James came from a very established and famous family. 10132 is the gun Here are the ledgers from AG&L what is interesting is Pryse and Squires are also on the ledger for outwork!
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