Joseph Manton

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MANTON
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Aug 31, 2018 11:39 am

Joseph Manton

Post by MANTON » Sun Sep 16, 2018 10:34 am

Hello!
I live in Denmark and have traveled in many countries also GB from 1976 for hunting and gun. Shot elephant, buffalo etc.
I have a great interest in English hunting weapons.
I have Purdey, Webley Scott, Alex Martin Cal. 20 etc.
I just bought a Joseph Manton changed from flintlock to cap, from 1815, never been open and Very little used in fantastic fine condition, I seek information for this.
I have the 2 Manton books.

Regards JCDK@LIVE.DK

Daryl Hallquist 59
Posts: 10
Joined: Fri Jun 16, 2017 3:51 pm

Re: Joseph Manton

Post by Daryl Hallquist 59 » Sat Nov 24, 2018 4:39 pm

I really cannot answer any more than are in the Manton books. Your post did make me revisit a question about two Mantons I own.

Both guns are probably percussion conversions from flintlock, but here the questions start. One gun is of high condition, but has an extra set of barrels by John Mullin. One is 28", the other 30" and both are in fine condition with good bores and finishes. Weights vary an ounce or two. The question is, "why two sets of barrels ?" on a muzzle loader ?

The second Manton is nicely cased in mahogany and still has much original finish remaining, along with accessories. Also, fitting nicely in the case is a "second stock and receiver" fitted to the original Manton barrels. This second stock and receiver is by John Krider and an accessory has an 1874 date written on it in ink or similar. Even more perplexing than the first gun with two sets of barrels, why would a second receiver and stock be made for an original fine condition gun ?

Your thoughts will be appreciated. Daryl Hallquist

John 39
Posts: 166
Joined: Mon May 22, 2017 5:30 pm

Re: Joseph Manton

Post by John 39 » Sun Nov 25, 2018 5:47 pm

Which set of barrels are by John Mullin ? If they are the 30 inch ones the 28 inch were probably originally 30 inch. They may have been blocked and blown up then shortened by 2 inches by John Mullin. This would have meant they were too short to enable full burning of the powder which meant loss of velocity, which is why John Mullin was asked to make new 30 inch barrels.

As regards the second Manton, are there any serial numbers? This may have been a pair (possibly not numbered 1 and 2 which happened at the time). The barrels may have been badly damaged and subsequently lost or thrown away. Maybe the action is original, which is why it fits the other barrels, but was re-stocked by John Krider.

Daryl Hallquist 59
Posts: 10
Joined: Fri Jun 16, 2017 3:51 pm

Re: Joseph Manton

Post by Daryl Hallquist 59 » Sun Nov 25, 2018 8:30 pm

John thanks for your thoughts. As to some of your questions, the Manton/John Mullin outfit is a Manton # 8875, marked Hanover Square London. The Mullin barrels have no serial no. but are 28" long Marked John Mullin New York, and the Manton barrels are 30 " long. Neither barrel shows a sign of length alteration and both are in about as good of condition as one can find from that period. Each fits the Manton #8875 receiver perfectly.

As to the Manton, serial # 6000, and John Krider combination, see the case. The set of barrels fit the the two receivers perfectly. I assume the Krider work was done several decades after the Manton conversion. Note the 1872 marks on the flask in the probably Krider case. Both stock/ receiver combos are in great condition, but the Krider one bears most of it's case colors. Stock dimensions are similar. Why, is the question. That is a lot of work to go to to fit up two receivers/stocks to one set of barrels, but they did it for some reason. I'll try to attach pictures of the latter to help you visualize the set up. Daryl Hallquist

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